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Home > Drugs unplugged. Facing the reality of drug abuse in Cork City: the results of research carried out by the Community Outreach Drugs Awareness Project.

Community Outreach Drugs Awareness Project. (1999) Drugs unplugged. Facing the reality of drug abuse in Cork City: the results of research carried out by the Community Outreach Drugs Awareness Project. Cork: Cork City Local Drugs Task Force.

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This report presents the results of year-long study of the drug situation in Cork, beginning in 1998. The report adopted a peer research approach in which the members of the Community Outreach Drugs Awareness Project, a Community Employment Scheme, designed and undertook the study themselves. The people involved in the scheme were supported by a research co-ordinator and a youth worker. A central aim of the study was to ascertain the views of young people in Cork on the subject of drug use. The findings of the study are presented under the following headings: Local Facilities; Schools; and Use of Drugs. The authors found that a large number of young people believed that there was not adequate recreational facilities for them, and many had difficulty being allowed use youth and sports clubs. The majority of young people surveyed were still attending school and spoke about their experiences of the educational system. The study found that the use of drugs is widespread among young people in Cork City. Overall 46% of respondents use cigarettes daily, 51% drink weekly, 24% smoke cannabis weekly and 13% took solvents and glue occasionally. The most common drugs used were alcohol, cigarettes and cannabis. The most common reasons given for taking drugs on their own were boredom and stress. The respondents identified the following as the most appropriate approach to the use of drugs by young people: establish drop in centres; provide better access to sports facilities; deal with educational disadvantage; increase the number of treatment centres; establish community-based support services for young people and parents; and, increase the level of consultation with young people.


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