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Home > ‘Marks and scars’ Hepatitis C and people who inject drugs: the family experience.

Adfam. (2017) ‘Marks and scars’ Hepatitis C and people who inject drugs: the family experience. London: Adfam.

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Hepatitis C is a blood-borne virus which predominantly affects the cells of the liver and is spread by direct exposure to infected blood, for example by sharing needles. It has become known as a ‘silent killer’; an individual can have it for years without any symptoms, or its symptoms, such as depression, fatigue, skin problems, pain and digestive problems, can be attributed to other causes. Despite the prevalence of hepatitis C, relatively little is known about it among the general public. Its impacts, however, can be far-reaching. Not only can it be fatal, sometimes causing fibrosis and cirrhosis of the liver, liver cancer or end stage liver disease, but it can also have other detrimental impacts on the individual who has contracted it, and those around them. Adfam has been funded by Gilead Sciences to research the impact of hepatitis C on the family members of people who inject drugs (PWID). Their experiences are largely unknown, and this research begins to fill that gap.


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