Skip Page Header

Home > A 3 year national longitudinal study comparing drug treatment outcomes for opioid users with and without children in their custodial care at intake.

Comiskey, Catherine (2013) A 3 year national longitudinal study comparing drug treatment outcomes for opioid users with and without children in their custodial care at intake. Journal of Substance Abuse Treatment , 44 , (1) , pp. 90-96.

The aim of this research was to measure the longitudinal effects of having children in a client's custodial care, on opioid treatment outcomes. A 3 year national, longitudinal study was implemented. Outcomes were measured using the Maudsley Addiction Profile, 404 clients (75% male) were recruited and 97% were located at 3 years. At 1 year significantly fewer of those with children in their care were using heroin, benzodiazepines and cannabis but having children in a client's care at intake was a significant and positive predictor of using other opioids at 1 year. Analysis also revealed that there was a significant reduction in the proportion using alcohol in the last 90 days and in the mean days alcohol was used among those with no children in their care.

Results demonstrate that having children in a client's care improves outcomes for heroin use but also suggest the possible use of substitution substances.

 

Click here to request a copy of this literature (must be logged in)

Repository Staff Only: item control page