Home > Trends in alcohol consumption in undergraduate third level students: 1992-1999.

O'Brien, S and Sinclair, Hamish and Soni, S and O'Dowd, Tom and Thomas, D (2001) Trends in alcohol consumption in undergraduate third level students: 1992-1999. Irish Journal of Medical Science , 170 , (4) , pp. 224-227.

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Alcohol consumption has increased in the Irish population in recent years. It is not known to what extent the student population has been affected by this increase. The aim of this study was to determine levels of alcohol consumption among undergraduates in one Irish university and identify changes in drinking patterns in the years 1992-1999.

Information on alcohol use was obtained by anonymous self-completed questionnaire in a stratified random cross-faculty sample of undergraduates in 1992 and 1999. The CAGE questionnaire to determine problem drinking was included in both surveys. A statistically significant (p=0.01) drop in weekly alcohol consumption by males was found, although the proportion of male problem drinkers increased. Consumption for females remained the same. Findings are contrary to recent figures for drinking patterns in young Irish people in general. The fall in alcohol consumption in male students may be linked to improved male insight into the negative effects of alcohol or to the substitution of cheaper available substances.


Item Type:Article
Date:October 2001
Call No:AA2, TN2.6, VH4.2
Page Range:pp. 224-227
Publisher:Royal Academy of Medicine in Ireland
Volume:170
Number:4
Keywords:AOD use pattern, AOD use, abuse, and dependence, CAGE Questionnaire, Ireland, overall AOD use pattern defined by amount, undergraduate student
EndNote:View
Accession Number:HRB 2227 (Available)
Subjects:VA Geographic area > Europe > Ireland
N Communication, information and education > Educational level > Undergraduate or graduate level
A Substance use, abuse, and dependence > Prevalence > Substance use behaviour > Alcohol consumption
T Demographic characteristics > Undergraduate or graduate student
A Substance use, abuse, and dependence > Prevalence

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