Home > Associations between smoking to relieve stress, motivation to stop and quit attempts across the social spectrum: a population survey in England.

Perski, Olga and Theodoraki, Maria and Cox, Sharon and Kock, Loren and Shahab, Lion and Brown, Jamie (2022) Associations between smoking to relieve stress, motivation to stop and quit attempts across the social spectrum: a population survey in England. PloS one, 17, (5), e0268447. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0268447.

External website: https://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.13...

Smoking prevalence in several high-income countries is steadily declining but remains persistently high in 'lower' socioeconomic position (SEP) groups, contributing to inequities in morbidity and mortality. Smoking to relieve stress is a commonly endorsed motive for continued smoking; however, it remains unclear whether smoking to relieve stress has a negative impact on motivation to stop and future quit attempts and if so, whether associations are moderated by SEP. This was an observational study with cross-sectional and prospective survey data from the nationally representative Smoking Toolkit Study in England. A total of 1,135 adult smokers were surveyed at baseline, with 153 (13.5%) respondents followed up at 12 months. Respondents provided information on demographic, social and smoking characteristics. A series of multivariable logistic regression analyses was conducted. Bayes Factors (BFs) were calculated to explore non-significant associations. Smoking to relieve stress was commonly endorsed by respondents from both 'lower' (43.2% [95% CI = 39.4%, 47.0%]) and 'higher' (40.5% [95% CI = 35.9%, 45.1%]) SEP groups (p = 0.39). Smoking to relieve stress was associated with high motivation to stop at baseline (ORadj = 1.48, 95% CI = 1.03-2.12, p = 0.035) but not significantly with the odds of making a quit attempt at a 12-month follow-up, although the magnitude and direction of the effect was similar to that observed for high motivation to stop (ORadj = 1.49, 95% CI = 0.69-3.20, p = 0.3). Data were insensitive to detect moderation effects of SEP (BF = 0.90 and BF = 1.65, respectively). Smoking to relieve stress is a commonly endorsed motive and is associated with high motivation to stop but not significantly with the odds of making a quit attempt in the next 12 months, although the magnitude and direction of the effect was similar for both outcomes. There was no clear evidence of moderation by SEP, although data were insensitive to distinguish the alternative from the null hypothesis.


Item Type
Article
Publication Type
International, Open Access, Article
Drug Type
Tobacco / Nicotine
Intervention Type
Prevention, Harm reduction
Date
2022
Identification #
https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0268447
Volume
17
Number
5
EndNote

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