Home > Reducing problematic alcohol use in employees: economic evaluation of guided and unguided web-based interventions alongside a three-arm randomized controlled trial.

Buntrock, Claudia and Freund, Johanna and Smit, Filip and Riper, Heleen and Lehr, Dirk and Boß, Leif and Berking, Matthias and Ebert, David Daniel (2021) Reducing problematic alcohol use in employees: economic evaluation of guided and unguided web-based interventions alongside a three-arm randomized controlled trial. Addiction, Early online, . doi: 10.1111/add.15718.

External website: https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/add.15...

AIMS: To perform an economic evaluation of guided and unguided internet-based interventions to reduce problematic alcohol consumption in employees compared with a waiting-list control condition (WLC) with unrestricted access to treatment-as-usual.

DESIGN: A cost-effectiveness analysis (CEA) and cost-utility analysis (CUA) from a societal and a cost-benefit analysis from the employer's perspective with a 6-month time horizon.

SETTING: Open recruitment in the German working population. Participants were employees (178 males, 256 females, mean age 47 years) consuming at least 14 (women) or 21 (men) standard units of alcohol (SUAs) per week and scoring ≥ 8 (men) or 6 (women) on the Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test.

MEASUREMENTS: On-line questionnaires administered to assess SUAs and assess quality of life (AQoL-8D) and resource use. Outcome measure was responder (≤ 14/≤ 21 SUAs) for the CEA and quality-adjusted life years (QALYs) for the CUA. Net benefit regression was used to estimate cost-effectiveness for each study arm. Bootstrapping and sensitivity analyses were performed to account for uncertainty.

INTERVENTIONS: Five weekly modules including personalized normative feedback, motivational interviewing, goal setting, problem-solving and emotion regulation, provided with adherence-focused guidance or without guidance . Controls were on a waiting-list.

FINDINGS: From a societal perspective, the guided intervention had a probability of 55% (54%) of being the most efficient strategy at a willingness-to-pay (WTP) of €0 per responder (QALY) gained, compared with the unguided intervention and the control condition. At a WTP of €20 000 per QALY gained, the probability was 78%. From an employer's perspective, the guided intervention had a higher probability of a positive return on investment (81%) compared with the unguided intervention (58%).

CONCLUSION: A guided internet-based intervention to reduce problematic alcohol consumption in employees appears to be both cost-beneficial and cost-effective.


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