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Home > Evaluating for differences by race/ethnicity in the association between income and gambling disorder.

Day, Brendan and Rosenthal, Geoffrey and Adetunji, Fiyinfolu and Monaghan, Andrea and Scheele, Christina and Tracy, J Kathleen (2020) Evaluating for differences by race/ethnicity in the association between income and gambling disorder. Journal of Gambling Studies . doi: 10.1007/s10899-020-09941-6.

URL: https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s10899-0...

Multiple studies show an increased prevalence of gambling disorder among African Americans compared to whites. However, few studies take an analytic approach to understanding differences in risk factors by race/ethnicity. Income is inversely associated with gambling disorder; we hypothesized that this association would vary by race/ethnicity. The main objective was to evaluate whether the association between income and gambling disorder varies by race/ethnicity. With data from the baseline visit of a prospective cohort study, Prevention and Etiology of Gambling Addiction Study in the United States, we used multivariable logistic regression analysis to determine whether the association between income and gambling disorder varies by race/ethnicity. 1164 participants were included in the final analyses. Measures included: demographics (age, sex, race/ethnicity, education, employment, annual household income), veteran status, marital status, homelessness, smoking, substance abuse, alcohol abuse, marijuana use, and lifetime gambling disorder diagnosis as derived from Alcohol Use Disorder and Associated Disabilities Interview Schedule.

There was no evidence of effect modification by race/ethnicity in the association between income and gambling disorder (global p value = 0.17). Income was associated with increased odds of gambling disorder, but only for those with low income (< $15,000; OR 2.27, 95% CI 1.46, 3.53). There was no evidence that the effect of income on gambling disorder varies by race/ethnicity. For all race/ethnicities combined, low income was associated with significantly increased odds of gambling disorder (OR 2.27, 95% CI 1.46, 3.53). Further research is needed to better understand racial/ethnic differences in gambling disorder.


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