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Home > Growing up in Ireland: infant cohort at 7/8 years.

Economic and Social Research Institute. (2017) Growing up in Ireland: infant cohort at 7/8 years. Dublin: ESRI; Trinity College Dublin; and Department of Youth and Community Affairs.

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PDF (1. Growing up infant cohort 7/8: school & learning)
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PDF (2. Growing up infant cohort 7/8: health & development)
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PDF (3. Growing up infant cohort 7/8: socio-emotional development and play)
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1. Growing Up in Ireland: School & Learning at 7/8 years of age

This Key Finding focuses on mothers’ reports of how their children were doing in terms of their schooling and learning. Children’s early experiences of the classroom, their transition to formal school and their acquisition of key skills such as literacy and numeracy typically have a lasting effect on their short- and long-term educational development. At the time of the postal survey 36% of the children in the study were 7 years old and the rest were 8 years old. At this stage, most of them had been in Primary School for 2-3 years. Overall, 69% started school in 2012 (mostly in September), the remainder in 2013. Just over 1% of the children were in Junior or Senior Infants, 32% were in First Class and 66% in Second Class. Just less than 1% were in third class, home-schooled or at a special school.

 

2. Growing Up in Ireland: Health & Development at 7/8 years of age

This Key Finding focuses on mothers’ reports on the general health of the children at 7/8 years of age, their development and health behaviours, as well as stability and changes from the age of 9 months. Health status and behaviours are important for overall well-being, enabling development in other areas of the child’s life as well as for future health.

 

3. Growing Up in Ireland: socio-emotional development, relationships and play at 7/8 years of age

This Key Finding focuses on reports of children’s socio-emotional development and their behaviour, social skills, family relationships and play activities. Children’s progress in developing social and emotional skills is important for coping with relationships at school and at home, as well as being an important part of their overall well-being.

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