Home > Feasibility of alcohol screening among patients receiving opioid treatment in primary care.

Henihan, Anne Marie and McCombe, Geoff and Klimas, Jan and Swan, Davina and Leahy, Dorothy and Anderson, Rolande and Bury, Gerard and Dunne, Colum and Keenan, Eamon and Lambert, John and Maher, David and O'Gorman, Clodagh SM and O'Toole, Thomas P and Saunders, Jean and Shorter, Gillian W and Smyth, Bobby P and Kaner, Eileen and Cullen, Walter (2016) Feasibility of alcohol screening among patients receiving opioid treatment in primary care. BMC Family Practice , 17 , (153) .

URL: http://bmcfampract.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1...


BACKGROUND: Identifying and treating problem alcohol use among people who also use illicit drugs is a challenge. Primary care is well placed to address this challenge but there are several barriers which may prevent this occurring. The objective of this study was to determine if a complex intervention designed to support screening and brief intervention for problem alcohol use among people receiving opioid agonist treatment is feasible and acceptable to healthcare providers and their patients in a primary care setting.

METHODS: A randomised, controlled, pre-and-post design measured feasibility and acceptability of alcohol screening based on recruitment and retention rates among patients and practices. Efficacy was measured by screening and brief intervention rates and the proportion of patients with problem alcohol use.

RESULTS: Of 149 practices that were invited, 19 (12.8 %) agreed to participate. At follow up, 13 (81.3 %) practices with 81 (62.8 %) patients were retained. Alcohol screening rates in the intervention group were higher at follow up than in the control group (53 % versus 26 %) as were brief intervention rates (47 % versus 19 %). Four (18 %) people reduced their problem drinking (measured by AUDIT-C), compared to two (7 %) in the control group.

CONCLUSIONS: Alcohol screening among people receiving opioid agonist treatment in primary care seems feasible. A definitive trial is needed. Such a trial would require over sampling and greater support for participating practices to allow for challenges in recruitment of patients and practices.

Item Type:Article
Date:November 2016
Publisher:BioMed Central
Volume:17
Number:153
EndNote:View
Subjects:A Substance use, abuse, and dependence > Prevalence > Substance use behaviour > Alcohol consumption
B Substances > Alcohol
B Substances > Opioids (opiates)
G Health and disease > Substance use disorder > Multiple substance use (Polydrug)
HJ Treatment method > Psychosocial treatment method > Individual therapy > Brief intervention
HJ Treatment method > Treatment outcome
J Health care, prevention and rehabilitation > Identification and screening > Identification and screening for substance use
J Health care, prevention and rehabilitation > Treatment and maintenance > Treatment factors
J Health care, prevention and rehabilitation > Health care programme or facility > Community-based treatment (primary care)
VA Geographic area > Europe > Ireland

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