Home > Are take-home naloxone programmes effective? Systematic review utilizing application of the Bradford Hill criteria.

McDonald, Rebecca and Strang, John . (2016) Are take-home naloxone programmes effective? Systematic review utilizing application of the Bradford Hill criteria. London: . Addiction, 111 (7) 10 p. DOI: 10.1111/add.13326

URL: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/add.133...

Fatal outcome of opioid overdose, once detected, is preventable through timely administration of the antidote naloxone. Take-home naloxone provision directly to opioid users for emergency use has been implemented recently in more than 15 countries worldwide, albeit mainly as pilot schemes and without formal evaluation. This systematic review assesses the effectiveness of take-home naloxone, with two specific aims: (1) to study the impact of take-home naloxone distribution on overdose-related mortality; and (2) to assess the safety of take-home naloxone in terms of adverse events.

Conclusions: Take-home naloxone programmes are found to reduce overdose mortality among programme participants and in the community and have a low rate of adverse events.


Item Type:Evidence resource
Publication Type:Review
Drug Type:Opioid
Intervention Type:AOD disorder harm reduction
Date:2016
Pages:10 p.
Place of Publication:London
Volume:111
Number:7
EndNote:View
Subjects:B Substances > Opioids (opiates) > Opioid product > Naloxone
G Health and disease > Substance use disorder > Drug use > Drug intoxication > Poisoning (overdose)
J Health care, prevention and rehabilitation > Substance use prevention > Substance use harm reduction
P Demography, epidemiology, and history > Population dynamics > Substance related mortality / death

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