Home > Perceptions of segregation and substance use behaviors in adolescence.

McAloney, Kareena (2015) Perceptions of segregation and substance use behaviors in adolescence. Journal of Child & Adolescent Substance Abuse , 24 , (5) , pp. 295-301.


Segregation is pervasive in Northern Ireland, and linked with health and health behaviors. This study aimed to explore the relationship between adolescents' reports of religious residential segregation and substance use.

Methods: A secondary analysis of data from 560 young people from the 2008 Northern Ireland Young Life and Times Survey.Results: Segregation was associated with solvent and illicit drug use, but not cigarette or alcohol use. Relationships differed by religious group membership, and by perceived majority status. Catholic adolescents who reported a Protestant majority were more likely to have used solvents. Protestant adolescents who reported a Protestant majority were more likely to have used illicit drugs.

Conclusions: This analysis revealed associations between residential segregation and substance use that were sensitive to religious group membership, and perceived majority group status. This highlights a need for further work to understand the nature of segregation and influence on well-being in divided societies.

Item Type:Article
Date:2015
Page Range:pp. 295-301
Publisher:Taylor & Francis
Volume:24
Number:5
EndNote:View
Subjects:A Substance use, abuse, and dependence > Prevalence > Substance use behaviour
G Health and disease > Public health
J Health care, prevention and rehabilitation > Risk and protective factors > Risk factors
L Social psychology and related concepts > Inclusion and exclusion
T Demographic characteristics > Adolescent / youth (teenager / young person)
VA Geographic area > Europe > Northern Ireland

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