Home > Factors associated with recently acquired hepatitis C virus infection in people who inject drugs in England, Wales and Northern Ireland: new findings from an unlinked anonymous monitoring survey.

Cullen, KJ and Hope, VD and Croxford, S and Shute, J and Ncube, F and Parry, JV (2015) Factors associated with recently acquired hepatitis C virus infection in people who inject drugs in England, Wales and Northern Ireland: new findings from an unlinked anonymous monitoring survey. Epidemiology and Infection , 143 , (7) , pp. 1398-407.

Monitoring infections and risk in people who inject drugs (PWID) is important for informing public health responses. In 2011, a novel hepatitis C antibody (anti-HCV) avidity-testing algorithm to identify samples compatible with recent primary infection was introduced into a national surveillance survey.

PWID are recruited annually, through >60 needle-and-syringe programmes and prescribing services. Of the 980 individuals that could have been at risk of HCV infection, there were 20 (2%) samples that were compatible with recent primary infection. These were more common among: those imprisoned ⩾5 times [8/213; adjusted odds ratio (aOR) 8·7, 95% confidence interval (CI) 2·04-37·03]; women (8/230; aOR 3·8, 95% CI 1·41-10·38); and those ever-infected with hepatitis B (5/56; aOR 6·25, 95% CI 2·12-18·43).

This study is the first to apply this algorithm and to examine the risk factors associated with recently acquired HCV infection in a national sample of PWID in the UK. These findings highlight underlying risks and suggest targeted interventions are needed.


Item Type:Article
Date:May 2015
Page Range:pp. 1398-407
Publisher:Cambridge
Volume:143
Number:7
EndNote:View
Related URLs:
Subjects:F Concepts in psychology > Specific attitude and behaviour > risk-taking behaviour
G Health and disease > Disorder by cause > Communicable disease > Hepatitis C
J Health care, prevention and rehabilitation > Health related prevention > Health information and education > Communicable disease control
T Demographic characteristics > Person who injects drugs (Intravenous / injecting)
VA Geographic area > Europe > United Kingdom
VA Geographic area > Europe > Northern Ireland

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