Home > Managing persistent pain in secure settings.

Faculty of Pain Medicine of the Royal College of Anaesthetists; the Royal College of General Practitioners; and the British Pain Society. [National Treatment Agency (UK)] (2013) Managing persistent pain in secure settings. London: Public Health England. (14 p.)

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This new guide for professionals working in custody settings is an overview of best practice in managing persistent pain and describes how this practice might be implemented in secure environments, including prisons, police custody and immigration removal centres. It offers advice on confirming a diagnosis of persistent pain in a secure setting.

The guide has been written in association with the Faculty of Pain Medicine of the Royal College of Anaesthetists, the Royal College of General Practitioners and the British Pain Society, and is supported by the Department of Health.

Contents:
Introduction 3
Aims of the document 3

1. The context
1.1 The size of the problem
1.2 Trends in prescribing
1.3 Additional challenges in specific settings
1.3.1 Female prison estate
1.3.2 Male high-security prisons

2. Clinical issues 5
2.1 Diagnosis and prescribing
2.1.1 Diagnosing persistent pain
2.1.2 Diagnosing neuropathic pain
2.1.3 Diagnosing chronic visceral pain and poorly defined disorders
2.1.4 The role of opioids in managing persistent pain
2.1.5 Pharmacological management of neuropathic pain
2.1.6 Pharmacological management of chronic visceral pain and poorly defined disorders
2.2 Non-pharmacological management of pain
2.2.1 Psychological interventions
2.2.2 Physical rehabilitation

Endnote 9
Further reading 9
Process of preparation 10
Appendix 1 11
Appendix 2 11
Appendix 3. Suggested treatment pathways: Assessing and initiating pain management 12
Opioid therapy guidance pathway 13


Item Type:Evidence resource
Publication Type:Guideline
Drug Type:Prescription/Over the counter, Opioid
Intervention Type:AOD disorder treatment method, AOD disorder drug therapy, AOD disorder
Source:National Treatment Agency (UK)
Date:2013
Publisher:Public Health England
Corporate Creators:Faculty of Pain Medicine of the Royal College of Anaesthetists; the Royal College of General Practitioners; and the British Pain Society
Place of Publication:London
Number:14 p.
EndNote:View
Accession Number:HRB (Electronic Only)
Related URLs:
Subjects:G Health and disease > State of health
MM-MO Crime and law > Justice system > Correctional system and facility > Prison
J Health care, prevention and rehabilitation > Health care programme or facility > Prison-based health service
N Communication, information and education > Recommendations or guidelines > Practice / clinical guidelines
VA Geographic area > Europe > United Kingdom
B Drugs and alcohol substances > Opioids (opiates)
T Demographic characteristics > Prison Inmate (prisoner)

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