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Drug and Alcohol Findings. (2013) Effectiveness Bank Bulletin. [Prison health care]. Effectiveness Bank Bulletin , 11 Jun .

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PDF (1. The effectiveness of Prisoners Addressing Substance Related Offending (P-ASRO) programme)
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PDF (2. Comparison of methadone and buprenorphine for opiate detoxification (LEEDS trial))
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PDF (3. The effectiveness of opioid maintenance treatment in prison settings)
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URL: http://findings.org.uk/docs/bulletins/Bull_11_06_1...

1. The effectiveness of Prisoners Addressing Substance Related Offending (P-ASRO) programme: evaluating the pre and post treatment psychometric outcomes in an adult male category C prison.
Crane M.A.J., Blud L. British Journal of Forensic Practice: 2012, 14(1), p.49–59.
From the early 2000s cognitive-behavioural group therapy programmes have been relied on to improve the anti-offending record of UK prisons and probation services, but evidence has been scarce and generally negative. This prison study at least suggests that one such programme does promote the intended psychological changes.

2. Comparison of methadone and buprenorphine for opiate detoxification (LEEDS trial): a randomised controlled trial.
Wright N.M.J., Sheard L., Adams C.E. et al. British Journal of General Practice: December 2011.
Three English prisons hosted the first randomised trial of tapering doses of buprenorphine versus methadone to ease the withdrawal of opiate users entering prison. As outside prison, there was little difference in their effectiveness, and three months later just a fifth of the (former) prisoners were assessed as no longer using illegal opiates.

3. The effectiveness of opioid maintenance treatment in prison settings: a systematic review.
Hedrich D., Alves P., Farrell M. et al. Addiction: 2012, 107(3), p. 501–517.
Largely due to the treatment's health benefits, this review argues that failure to implement effective opioid maintenance programmes in prison represents an important missed opportunity to engage high-risk drug users in treatment, at possibly substantial costs both to individuals and to the community.


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