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Home > Analysis of school attendance data at primary and post-primary levels for 2004-2005

Educational Disadvantage Committee. (2006) Analysis of school attendance data at primary and post-primary levels for 2004-2005. Dublin: National Education Welfare Board.

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The National Educational Welfare Board's (NEWB) analysis of school attendance for the school year 2004/2005, released today (6th July 2006) shows that attendance has improved in many of the areas targeted specifically by NEWB, such as primary and post-primary schools in designated disadvantaged areas. In a number of these targeted areas, the mean percentage of students absent 20 days or more has improved by over 4%.

The report shows a strong link between levels of disadvantage and levels of non attendance. Primary school students in the most disadvantaged areas missed on average 15 school days in the school year 2004 / 2005 compared to an average of 10 school days missed by primary school students in the least disadvantaged areas. Post-primary school students in the most disadvantaged areas missed on average 21 days in that year compared to an average of 10 school days missed by students in the least disadvantaged areas.

Related Publications Moving Beyond Educational Disadvantage Report of the Educational Disadvantage Committee 2002-2005 In December 2005 the report Moving beyond educational disadvantage was published. Prepared by the Educational Disadvantage Committee (set up by the Minister for Education in April 2002 under section 32 of the Education Act 1998, ‘to advise the Minister on policies and strategies to be adopted to identify and correct educational Disadvantage’), the report sets out guidelines for effective services to address educational disadvantage, envisages the way forward in developing an integrated approach to educational inclusion and equality and concludes with a strategy for an inclusive, diverse and dynamic learning society without barriers. It suggests that educational equality will only be achieved within the broader context of achieving social inclusion, and argues that poverty and other issues that contribute to educational disadvantage, such as drug and alcohol abuse, must be tackled in parallel and in an integrated way.

Item Type
Report
Publication Type
Irish-related, Report
Drug Type
All substances
Intervention Type
Education and training
Date
6 July 2006
Publisher
National Education Welfare Board
Corporate Creators
Educational Disadvantage Committee
Place of Publication
Dublin
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