Home > Measuring and improving cost, cost-effectiveness, and cost-benefit for substance abuse treatment programs: a manual.

Yates, Brian T (1999) Measuring and improving cost, cost-effectiveness, and cost-benefit for substance abuse treatment programs: a manual. Bethesda, MD: National Institute on Drug Abuse, Division of Clinical and Services Research.

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Measuring and Improving Cost, Cost-Effectiveness, and Cost-Benefit for Substance Abuse Treatment Programs: A Manual takes the mystery out of cost accounting. Treatment programs, regardless of their funding sources, are faced with constant pressures to keep costs to a minimum and to justify every expenditure. Yet accounting for costs takes time that might better be spent on treatment itself. Also, program staff trained in helping people may not be proficient in tracking money.

The National Institute on Drug Abuse, as part of its mission to assist programs that treat substance abusers, has sponsored research related to cost issues. The results of these studies are available to treatment programs at no cost as part of NIDA's policy of transferring technology as soon as possible. One example of this is Measuring and Improving Cost, Cost-Effectiveness, and Cost-Benefit for Substance Abuse Treatment Programs: A Manual.

The manual describes several ways to determine cost effectiveness and benefits, ranging from simple educated estimates to sophisticated, computerized methods. It even shows you how to find people at little or no cost to help you collect and analyze the data.

No background in accounting or research is needed to use the methods described in the manual. The hands-on format and step-by-step instructions, exercises, and worksheets are designed to guide professionals from a variety of disciplines and educational backgrounds through the collection and analysis of data on costs, procedures, effectiveness, and benefits. Most of these data are already being collected for other purposes, such as billing or evaluating patient progress.


Date:1999
Call No:JQ6.2, MQ8.10
Pages:xi, 12
Publisher:National Institute on Drug Abuse, Division of Clinical and Services Research
Place of Publication:Bethesda, MD
EndNote:View
Accession Number:HRB 1378 (Available)
Related URLs:
Subjects:MP-MR Policy, planning, economics, work and social services > Economic policy
MP-MR Policy, planning, economics, work and social services > Economic aspects of substance use (cost / pricing)
MA-ML Social science, culture and community > Social costs and benefits > Social costs and benefits of substance use
MP-MR Policy, planning, economics, work and social services > Programme planning, implementation, and evaluation > Programme and budget analysis (cost benefit)

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