Home > Hepatitis B, hepatitis C and HIV in Irish prisoners, part II: prevalence and risk in committal prisoners 1999.

Trinity College Dublin. Department of Community Health and General Practice. Long, Jean and Allwright, Shane and Barry, Joseph and Reaper-Reynolds, Sheilagh and Thornton, Lelia and Bradley, Fiona (2000) Hepatitis B, hepatitis C and HIV in Irish prisoners, part II: prevalence and risk in committal prisoners 1999. Dublin: Stationery Office.

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The results of a census survey of 1205 Irish prisoners, published in August 1999, showed that the prevalence of infection with hepatitis B was 9%, the prevalence of infection with hepatitis C was 37%, and the prevalence of infection with HIV was 2%. The current report presents the results of a survey of committal prisoners. The reason the committal survey was undertaken was to ensure adequate representation of short-term prisoners, and to determine if the prevalence of the infections differed in committal prisoners from that found in 'resident' prisoners. Five of the seven Irish committal prisons were included in the survey. A total of 607 prisoners took part in the survey, a response rate of 96%. The survey consisted of completing a four page questionnaire and collecting a sample of oral fluid for testing for antibodies to hepatitis B, hepatitis C and HIV. The fieldwork was carried out between 6th April and 1st May 1999.

Overall the prevalence of infection with hepatitis B among committal prisoners was 6%, the prevalence of infection with hepatitis C was 37% and the prevalence of HIV was 2%. Almost one quarter (140/596) of the committal prisoners tested and evidence of at least one of the three infections. Prevalence in women prisoners was significantly higher: 22% for hepatitis B, 56% for hepatitis C, and 10% for HIV. Prevalence was also higher among drug users (18% for hepatitis B, 72% for hepatitis C, and 6% for HIV) and in the Dublin prisons. Multivariate logistic regression analyses showed that injecting drug use was by far the most important predictor of hepatitis B and hepatitis C infection. Female gender was an independent risk factor for all three infections. Reporting treatment for sexually transmitted infection, and increasing time spent in prison, were also associated with higher rates of hepatitis C. Among injecting drug users, sharing needles in prison and high frequencies of injecting in the previous month were linked to increased risk of hepatitis C infection. The prevalence of HIV was higher in those who had spent more than three of the last 10 years in prisons.


Date:2000
Call No:GH16.12.6, MO4.12, VH4.2
Pages:59 p.
Publisher:Stationery Office
Corporate Creators:Trinity College Dublin. Department of Community Health and General Practice
Place of Publication:Dublin
ISBN:0-7076-6437-3
Keywords:hepatitis B, hepatitis C, intravenous drug user, Ireland, methadone maintenance, multivariate analysis, needle sharing, prison, prison-based health service, tattooing, unsafe sex
Notes:Includes bibliographical references.
EndNote:View
Accession Number:HRB 487 (Available)
Subjects:J Health care, prevention and rehabilitation > Health care programme or facility > Prison-based health service
MM-MO Crime and law > Justice system > Correctional system and facility > Prison
G Health and disease > Disorder by cause > Communicable disease > Hepatitis B
G Health and disease > Etiology > Disease transmission factor > Needle sharing
T Demographic characteristics > Prison Inmate (prisoner)
J Health care, prevention and rehabilitation > Health-related prevention > Health information and education > Communicable disease control
G Health and disease > Disorder by cause > Communicable disease > Hepatitis C
G Health and disease > Disorder by cause > Communicable disease > HIV infection
F Concepts in psychology > Specific attitude and behaviour > risk-taking behaviour

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