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Home > Strategies to improve smoking cessation rates in primary care.

Lindson, Nicola and Pritchard, Gillian and Hong, Bosun and Fanshawe, Thomas R and Pipe, Andrew and Papadakis, Sophia (2021) Strategies to improve smoking cessation rates in primary care. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, (9), . Art. No.: CD011556. DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD011556.pub2.

External website: https://www.cochranelibrary.com/cdsr/doi/10.1002/1...


Primary care is an important setting in which to treat tobacco addiction. However, the rates at which providers address smoking cessation and the success of that support vary. Strategies can be implemented to improve and increase the delivery of smoking cessation support (e.g. through provider training), and to increase the amount and breadth of support given to people who smoke (e.g. through additional counseling or tailored printed materials).

More people probably stop smoking for at least six months when they are given additional counseling (22 studies, 18,150 people), free stop‐smoking medications (10 studies, 7560 people), or printed materials tailored to them (6 studies, 15,978 people), as part of stop‐smoking support in primary care. We are uncertain whether providing people with feedback on markers of their individual health risk, providing healthcare providers with training, or with rewards for providing stop‐smoking support, help more people to quit.

Thirty‐four studies looked at more than one strategy to improve stop‐smoking treatment in primary care. Combinations differed greatly across studies, with different levels of success, and it was not possible to draw conclusions on what worked best. There was not enough information to help us clearly understand whether there were increases in the amount of stop‐smoking support provided or increases in the numbers of people making a quit attempt.

Item Type
Article
Publication Type
International, Review, Article
Drug Type
Tobacco / Nicotine
Intervention Type
Drug therapy, Treatment method, Psychosocial treatment method, Rehabilitation/Recovery
Date
September 2021
Identification #
Art. No.: CD011556. DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD011556.pub2
Publisher
John Wiley & Sons, Ltd
Number
9
EndNote

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