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Home > Clinical question: How does mode of delivery impact effectiveness of motivational and behavioral smoking cessation interventions?

Burch, Jane and Jackson, Christopher (2021) Clinical question: How does mode of delivery impact effectiveness of motivational and behavioral smoking cessation interventions? Cochrane Clinical Answers, . https://doi.org/10.1002/cca.3532.

External website: https://www.cochranelibrary.com/cca/doi/10.1002/cc...


Reviewers performed a network meta‐analysis (NMA) evaluating how the mode of delivery impacts the effectiveness of smoking cessation interventions. The network included 284 trials with 659 trial arms; the number of participants included in the NMA receiving the intervention by each mode ranged from 1082 to 115,067 participants. Quit rates were low in all groups (on average, < 10%). Moderate‐certainty evidence shows that providing the intervention via text messaging probably increases the numbers of people quitting by 25 per 1000 people compared with no intervention (on average). Reviewers identified only low‐ to very low‐certainty evidence for the remaining 13 modes of delivery (group or individual sessions, face‐to‐face, telephone, Internet/computer, printed materials, telephone app, static or interactive video, audio, interactive voice response, quitline access,

See also, on Cochrane website:

How do motivational and behavioral interventions compare with no intervention for smoking cessation?

Reviewers performed a network meta‐analysis (NMA) comparing effects of different components of smoking cessation interventions versus no treatment. The NMA included 284 trials with 659 trial arms; the number of included participants receiving each component ranged from 701 to 158,222. Quit rates were low in all groups (on average, < 10%). High‐certainty evidence shows that two interventions (counseling and guaranteed financial incentives) increase the number of people quitting by at least 20 per 1000 people (on average). Reviewers identified moderate‐certainty evidence showing that interventions with content focused on how to quit, interventions with a motivational component, and tailored interventions improve quit rates but the additional numbers quitting were lower (on average, 5 to 11 per 1000 people). Only low‐ to very low‐certainty evidence was available for the seven other components assessed (content focused on why quit, promotion of adjuvant activities such as advice on stop‐smoking medication and social support, self‐regulation, biofeedback, hypnotherapy, exercise, non‐guaranteed financial incentives).

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