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Home > Prevalence of medical cannabis use and associated health conditions documented in electronic health records among primary care patients in Washington State.

Matson, Theresa E and Carrell, David S and Bobb, Jennifer F and Cronkite, David J and Oliver, Malia M and Luce, Casey and Ghitza, Udi E and Hsu, Clarissa W and Campbell, Cynthia I and Browne, Kendall C and Binswanger, Ingrid A and Saxon, Andrew J and Bradley, Katharine A and Lapham, Gwen T (2021) Prevalence of medical cannabis use and associated health conditions documented in electronic health records among primary care patients in Washington State. JAMA Network Open, 4, (5), e219375. https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/33956129/.

External website: https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jamanetworkopen/f...

Importance: Many people use cannabis for medical reasons despite limited evidence of therapeutic benefit and potential risks. Little is known about medical practitioners' documentation of medical cannabis use or clinical characteristics of patients with documented medical cannabis use.

Objectives: To estimate the prevalence of past-year medical cannabis use documented in electronic health records (EHRs) and to describe patients with EHR-documented medical cannabis use, EHR-documented cannabis use without evidence of medical use (other cannabis use), and no EHR-documented cannabis use.

Main Outcomes and Measures: Health conditions for which cannabis use has potential benefits or risks were defined based on National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine's review. The adjusted prevalence of conditions diagnosed in the prior year were estimated across 3 categories of EHR-documented cannabis use with logistic regression.

Results: A total of 185 565 patients (mean [SD] age, 52.0 [18.1] years; 59% female, 73% White, 94% non-Hispanic, and 61% commercially insured) were screened for cannabis use in a primary care visit during the study period. Among these patients, 3551 (2%) had EHR-documented medical cannabis use, 36 599 (20%) had EHR-documented other cannabis use, and 145 415 (78%) had no documented cannabis use. Patients with medical cannabis use had a higher prevalence of health conditions for which cannabis has potential benefits compared with patients with other cannabis use or no cannabis use. In addition, patients with medical cannabis use had a higher prevalence of health conditions for which cannabis has potential risks compared with patients with other cannabis use or no cannabis use.

Conclusions and Relevance: In this cross-sectional study, primary care patients with documented medical cannabis use had a high prevalence of health conditions for which cannabis use has potential benefits, yet a higher prevalence of conditions with potential risks from cannabis use. These findings suggest that practitioners should be prepared to discuss potential risks and benefits of cannabis use with patients.


Item Type
Article
Publication Type
International, Open Access, Article
Drug Type
Cannabis, Prescription/Over the counter
Intervention Type
Drug therapy, Treatment method
Source
Date
3 May 2021
Identification #
https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/33956129/
Page Range
e219375
Volume
4
Number
5
EndNote

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