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Home > Common and distinct neural connectivity in attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder and alcohol use disorder: a study using resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging.

Farré-Colomés, Àlvar and Gerhardt, Sarah and Luderer, Mathias and Sobanski, Esther and Kiefer, Falk and Vollstädt-Klein, Sabine (2021) Common and distinct neural connectivity in attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder and alcohol use disorder: a study using resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging. Alcoholism, Clinical and Experimental Research , Early online . doi: 10.1111/acer.14593.

External website: https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/acer.1...

BACKGROUND: The relation between Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) and Alcohol Use Disorder (AUD) has been widely demonstrated. In this study, we aimed to investigate the connectivity traits that would help to understand the strong link between both disorders using a neuroimaging perspective.

METHODS: The study included an AUD group (N = 18), an ADHD group (N = 17), a group with AUD+ADHD comorbidity individuals (N = 12) and a control group (N = 18). We used resting-state functional connectivity in a seed-based approach in the Default Mode Networks, the Dorsal Attention Network and the Salience Network.

RESULTS: Within the Default Mode Networks, all groups shared increased connectivity towards the Temporal Gyrus when compared to the control group. Regarding the Dorsal Attention Network, the Brodmann Area 6 presented increased connectivity for each disorder group in comparison with the control group, displaying the strongest aberrations in the AUD+ADHD group. In the Salience Network, the Prefrontal Cortex showed decreased connectivity in every disorder group compared to the control group.

CONCLUSIONS: Despite the small and unequal sample size, our study suggests common neurobiological alterations in AUD and ADHD, supporting the hypothesis that ADHD might be a risk factor for the development of an AUD. The results highlight the importance of an early ADHD diagnosis and treatment to reduce this risk for a subsequent AUD.


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