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Home > Online interventions for problem gamblers with and without co-occurring unhealthy alcohol use: Randomized controlled trial.

Cunningham, John A and Hodgins, David C and Keough, Matthew and Hendershot, Christian S and Schell, Christina and Godinho, Alexandra (2020) Online interventions for problem gamblers with and without co-occurring unhealthy alcohol use: Randomized controlled trial. Internet Interventions , 19 , (100307) , p. 100307. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.invent.2020.100307.

URL: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/...

Background and aims: Problem gambling and unhealthy alcohol use often co-occur. The current trial sought to establish whether adding a brief online intervention for unhealthy alcohol use to an online problem gambling intervention would lead to improvements in gambling and drinking among those with both of these concerns.

Methods: Participants were recruited from across Canada using an advertisement targeting those concerned about their gambling who were interested in online help. No mention of unhealthy alcohol use was made in the advertisement. Participants meeting criteria for problem gambling were randomized to either receive just an online intervention for gambling (G-only) or to receive an online gambling intervention plus a brief personalized feedback intervention for unhealthy alcohol use (G + A). Participants were followed up at 3 and 6 months.

Results: A total of 282 participants were recruited for the trial. Follow-up rates were good (80% and 84% at 3 and 6 months). There were significant reductions in gambling (p < .001) across time but no significant differences (p > .05) between those who received either the G-only or G + A interventions. Further, for those with unhealthy alcohol use (41% of the sample), there were no significant reductions in alcohol consumption (p > .05) across time or differences between condition.

Discussion and conclusion: The addition of a brief intervention for unhealthy alcohol use to an online intervention for gambling did not appear to improve either gambling or drinking outcomes among people concerned about their gambling. Further research is merited to examine whether a combined intervention (with gambling and drinking components integrated) might result in improved outcomes and whether such an intervention might benefit the subgroup of participants who would specifically seek help for both gambling and alcohol concerns.


Item Type
Article
Publication Type
International, Open Access, Article
Drug Type
Alcohol, Behavioural addiction
Intervention Type
Alternative medical treatment
Date
March 2020
Identification #
https://doi.org/10.1016/j.invent.2020.100307
Page Range
p. 100307
Publisher
Science Direct
Volume
19
Number
100307
EndNote

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