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Home > Identifying mental health and substance use disorders using emergency department and hospital records: a population-based retrospective cohort study of diagnostic concordance and disease attribution.

Wang, Linwei and Homayra, Fahmida and Pearce, Lindsay A and Panagiotoglou, Dimitra and McKendry, Rachael and Barrios, Rolando and Mitton, Craig and Nosyk, Bohdan (2019) Identifying mental health and substance use disorders using emergency department and hospital records: a population-based retrospective cohort study of diagnostic concordance and disease attribution. BMJ Open, 9, (7), e030530. doi: 10.1136/bmjopen-2019-030530.

External website: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC66294...

OBJECTIVES: Administrative data are increasingly being used for surveillance and monitoring of mental health and substance use disorders (MHSUD) across Canada. However, the validity of the diagnostic codes specific to MHSUD is unknown in emergency departments (EDs). Our objective was to determine the concordance, and individual-level and hospital-level factors associated with concordance, between diagnosis codes assigned in ED and at discharge from hospital for MHSUD-related conditions.

DESIGN: Population-based retrospective cohort study.
SETTING: EDs and hospitals within Vancouver Coastal Health Authority (VCH), British Columbia, Canada.
PARTICIPANTS: 16 926 individuals who were admitted into a VCH hospital following an ED visit from 1 April 2009 to 31 March 2017, contributing to 48 116 pairs of ED and hospital discharge diagnoses.

PRIMARY AND SECONDARY OUTCOME MEASURES: We examined concordance in identifying MHSUD between the primary discharge diagnosis codes based on the International Statistical Classification of Diseases, 9th and 10th Revisions (Canada) assigned in the ED and those assigned in the hospital among all ED visits resulting in a hospital admission. We calculated the percent overall agreement, positive agreement, negative agreement and Cohen's kappa coefficient. We performed multiple regression analyses to identify factors independently associated with discordance.

RESULTS: We found a high level of concordance for broad categories of MH conditions (overall agreement=0.89, positive agreement=0.74 and kappa=0.67), and a fair level of concordance for SUDs (overall agreement=0.89, positive agreement=0.31 and kappa=0.27). SUDs were less likely to be indicated as the primary cause in ED as opposed to in hospital (3.8% vs 11.7%). In multiple regression analyses, ED visits occurring during holidays, weekends and overnight (21:00-8:59 hours) were associated with increased odds of discordance in identifying MH conditions (adjusted OR 1.47, 95% CI 1.11 to 1.93; 1.27, 95% CI 1.16 to 1.40; 1.30, 95% CI 1.19 to 1.42, respectively).

CONCLUSIONS: ED data could be used to improve surveillance and monitoring of MHSUD. Future efforts are needed to improve screening for individuals with MHSUD and subsequently connect them to treatment and follow-up care.


Item Type
Article
Publication Type
International, Open Access, Article
Drug Type
All substances
Intervention Type
Treatment method, Harm reduction, Screening / Assessment
Date
11 July 2019
Identification #
doi: 10.1136/bmjopen-2019-030530
Pages
e030530
Page Range
e030530
Volume
9
Number
7
EndNote

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