Home > Effect of tobacco smoking on the risk of developing community acquired pneumonia: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

Baskaran, Vadsala and Murray, Rachael L and Hunter, Abby and Lim, Wei Shen and McKeever, Tricia M . (2019) Effect of tobacco smoking on the risk of developing community acquired pneumonia: A systematic review and meta-analysis. PLoS ONE, 14 (7 e0220204) https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0220204

URL: https://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.13...

AIM: To summarise and quantify the effect of tobacco smoking on the risk of developing community acquired pneumonia (CAP) in adults.

METHODS: We systematically searched MEDLINE, Embase, CINAHL, PsychINFO and Web of Science, from inception to October 2017, to identify case-control and cohort studies and reported in accordance with the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analysis (PRISMA) checklist. The review protocol was registered with the PROSPERO database (CRD42018093943). Study quality was assessed by the Newcastle-Ottawa Scale. Pooled odds ratios (ORs) or hazard ratios (HRs) were estimated using a random-effects model.

RESULTS: Of 647 studies identified, 27 studies were included (n = 460,592 participants) in the systematic review. Most of the included studies were of moderate quality with a median score of six (IQR 6-7). Meta-analysis showed that current smokers (pooled OR 2.17, 95% CI 1.70-2.76, n = 13 studies; pooled HR 1.52, 95% CI 1.13-2.04, n = 7 studies) and ex-smokers (pooled OR 1.49, 95% CI 1.26-1.75, n = 8 studies; pooled HR 1.18, 95% CI 0.91-1.52, n = 6 studies) were more likely to develop CAP compared to never smokers. Although the association between passive smoking and risk of CAP in adults of all ages was not statistically significant (pooled OR 1.13, 95% CI 0.94-1.36, n = 5 studies), passive smoking in adults aged ≥65 years was associated with a 64% increased risk of CAP (pooled OR 1.64; 95% CI 1.17-2.30, n = 2 studies). Dose-response analyses of data from five studies revealed a significant trend; current smokers who smoked higher amount of tobacco had a higher risk of CAP.

CONCLUSION: Tobacco smoke exposure is significantly associated with the development of CAP in current smokers and ex-smokers. Adults aged > 65 years who are passive smokers are also at higher risk of CAP. For current smokers, a significant dose-response relationship is evident.


Item Type:Evidence resource
Publication Type:Review
Drug Type:Tobacco
Intervention Type:AOD disorder harm reduction
Date:2019
Page Range:e0220204
Volume:14
Number:7 e0220204
EndNote:View
Subjects:B Substances > Tobacco (cigarette smoking)
G Health and disease > State of health > Physical health
G Health and disease > Disorder by cause > Communicable disease > Viral disease
J Health care, prevention and rehabilitation > Health related prevention > Health information and education > Communicable disease control

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