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Home > Theory of change and logic model for an outreach programme for gay, bisexual and other men who have sex with men.

Witzel, T Charles (2020) Theory of change and logic model for an outreach programme for gay, bisexual and other men who have sex with men. Dublin: HSE Sexual Health & Crisis Pregnancy Programme.

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The HSE Sexual Health & Crisis Pregnancy Programme (SHCPP) is part of the Strategic Planning and Transformation Function of the HSE and is responsible for implementing the National Sexual Health Strategy (2015–2020) and relevant actions. The aims of the national strategy are to improve sexual health and wellbeing and to reduce negative sexual health outcomes. A key focus of the strategy is the prevention of negative sexual health outcomes and the promotion of equitable, accessible and high-quality sexual health services, which are tailored and targeted to need. The strategy recognises the importance of sexual health intelligence and evidence-based information to guide the development and delivery of sexual health services.

P.8. Chemsex, the use of specific drugs (mephedrone, methamphetamine, ketamine and GHB/GBL) in a sexual setting, is an emerging issue in Ireland generally and Dublin specifically. Engagement in chemsex can present unique challenges relating to overdoses (especially from GHB/GBL); increases in blood-borne virus transmission through the sharing of needles or injecting equipment; the potential to increase HIV and STI transmission through CAI with multiple partners as well as general negative impacts on mental health. In the MISI survey 7% of MSM overall reported use of chemsex drugs in the 12 months preceding the survey, a figure which rose to 9% of MSM in Dublin. In EMIS 2017, 25% reported use of stimulant drugs to make sex last longer in the preceding 12 months. In MISI 2015, Chemsex was found to be more common among HIV-positive MSM, indicating this sub-group may have pronounced need for harm-reduction advice. Another study conducted amongst GMHS attendees found that 27% of the 90% of attendees who agreed to participate in the survey had used chemsex drugs in the preceding 12 months. Significant harms were identified by participants, including overdose from GHB/GBL and a dissatisfaction with the impact chemsex drugs were having on their lives. Encouragingly, one-third of chemsex-engaged MSM were interested in support around the issue).


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