Home > National Drug Treatment Reporting System 2012–2018 alcohol data.

Health Research Board. (2019) National Drug Treatment Reporting System 2012–2018 alcohol data. Dublin: Health Research Board.

[img]
Preview
PDF (NDTRS 2012–2018 alcohol data) - Published Version
1MB
[img]
Preview
PDF (2012–2018 alcohol data infographic) - Published Version
433kB

Level of problem alcohol use

  • Between 2012 and 2018, 54,263 cases were treated for problem alcohol use. The number of cases decreased from a high of 8,609 in 2012 to 7,464 in 2018.
  • In 2018 there was a small increase in cases, from 7,350 in 2017, to 7,464 in 2018. Seven in ten (71%) cases were already alcohol dependent** when they presented for treatment.
  • In 2018, the rate of alcohol dependency was similar for men and women.
  • The median number of standard drinks consumed on a typical drinking day was 15 for women and was 20 for men.
  • In 2018, the median age at which cases first started drinking was 15 years, slightly lower than previous years. 

Socio-demographics

  • The median age of treated cases was 41 years, similar to previous years.
  • Almost two-in-three cases were men (65%).
  • Just over half (51%) of cases were unemployed.
  • The proportion of cases that were homeless increased from one-in-twenty cases in 2012 to one-in-ten in 2018.
  • Cases recorded as Irish Traveller in ethnicity represented 2% of all cases.

Polydrug use

Polydrug use (problem use of more than one drug) was a factor in just over one in five cases treated for problem alcohol use. This has remained relatively stable in the period 2012 (19%) to 2018 (22%).

  • Cannabis was the most common additional drug used. The number of cases reported declined from 1,057 in 2012 to 940 in 2018.
  • Cocaine was the second most common additional drug recorded. This has increased from 453 in 2012 to 772 in 2018.
  • In 2018, cocaine as an additional drug was more common among men (one in two cases) than women (two in five cases).
  • Benzodiazepines were the third most common additional drug, reported in almost one-in-four cases. A greater proportion of women than men reported use of benzodiazepines with alcohol.
  • In 2018, opioids as an additional drug are more common among women (17%) than males (12%). 

Gender comparison

  • Median age of treated cases was higher for women (43 years) than men (40 years). This is reflected in the median age for new cases entering treatment (39 for men, 42 for women)
  • A higher proportion of women were aged 50 years or over (one-in-three women compared to one in four men).
  • The median number of standard drinks on a typical drinking day was 15 for women and 20 for men.
  • Preferred drinks for women were spirits (36%), wine (35%) followed by beer (20%). For men: beer (45%), spirits (38%) and wine (9%)
  • Cannabis is the most common additional drug for both men and women, followed by cocaine.
  • Benzodiazepines (28% females, 21% males) and opioids (17% females, 12% males) are reported at a higher rate by females than males.
  • Homelessness among cases treated for problem alcohol use was twice as common among males (12%) than females (6%).
Date:November 2019
Pages:10 p.
Publisher:Health Research Board
Corporate Creators:Health Research Board
Place of Publication:Dublin
EndNote:View
Accession Number:HRB (Electronic Only)
Subjects:B Substances > Alcohol
G Health and disease > Substance use disorder > Alcohol use
G Health and disease > Substance use disorder > Alcohol use > Alcohol dependence
HJ Treatment method > General treatment method concepts
HJ Treatment method > Treatment outcome
J Health care, prevention and rehabilitation > Treatment and maintenance > Treatment factors
VA Geographic area > Europe > Ireland

Repository Staff Only: item control page