Home > The costs of negative affect attributable to alcohol consumption in later life: A within-between random longitudinal econometric model using UK Biobank.

Li, Chenlu and Moore, Simon C and Smith, Jesse and Bauermeister, Sarah and Gallacher, John . (2019) The costs of negative affect attributable to alcohol consumption in later life: A within-between random longitudinal econometric model using UK Biobank. Public Library of Science. PLoS ONE, 14 (2)

URL: https://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.13...

AIMS: Research demonstrates a negative relationship between alcohol use and affect, but the value of deprecation is unknown and thus cannot be included in estimates of the cost of alcohol to society. This paper aims to examine this relationship and develop econometric techniques to value the loss in affect attributable to alcohol consumption.

METHODS: Cross-sectional (n = 129,437) and longitudinal (n = 11,352) analyses of alcohol consumers in UK Biobank data were undertaken, with depression and neuroticism as proxies of negative affect. The cross-sectional relationship between household income, negative affect and alcohol consumption were analysed using regression models, controlling for confounding variables, and using within-between random models that are robust to unobserved heterogeneity. The differential in household income required to offset alcohol's detriment to affect was derived.

RESULTS: A consistent relationship between depression and alcohol consumption (β = 0.001, z = 7.64) and neuroticism and alcohol consumption (β = 0.001, z = 9.24) was observed in cross-sectional analyses, replicated in within-between models (depression β = 0.001, z = 2.32; neuroticism β = 0.001, z = 2.33). Significant associations were found between household income and depression (cross sectional β = -0.157, z = -23.86, within-between β = -0.146, z = -9.51) and household income and neuroticism (cross sectional β = -0.166, z = -32.02, within-between β = -0.158, z = -7.44). The value of reducing alcohol consumption by one gram/day was pooled and estimated to be £209.06 (95% CI £171.84 to £246.27).

CONCLUSIONS: There was a robust relationship between alcohol consumption and negative affect. Econometric methods can value the intangible effects of alcohol use and may, therefore, facilitate the fiscal determination of benefit.


Item Type:Evidence resource
Publication Type:Report
Drug Type:Alcohol
Intervention Type:AOD disorder, AOD disorder harm reduction
Date:2019
Page Range:e0211357
Publisher:Public Library of Science
Volume:14
Number:2
EndNote:View
Subjects:A Substance use, abuse, and dependence > Prevalence > Substance use behaviour > Alcohol consumption
A Substance use, abuse, and dependence > Effects and consequences
B Substances > Alcohol
G Health and disease > State of health > Mental health
G Health and disease > Substance related disorder > Substance related mental disorder
J Health care, prevention and rehabilitation > Risk and protective factors > Risk factors
J Health care, prevention and rehabilitation > Health care economics
MA-ML Social science, culture and community > Social costs and benefits > Social costs and benefits of substance use

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