Skip Page Header

Home > Clinical question: How do financial incentives compare with usual care or less intensive interventions for helping women stop smoking during pregnancy?

Villyen Motaze, Nkengafac (2017) Clinical question: How do financial incentives compare with usual care or less intensive interventions for helping women stop smoking during pregnancy? Cochrane Clinical Answers .

URL: https://www.cochranelibrary.com/cca/doi/10.1002/cc...

Compared with usual care, financial incentives, when used as a single intervention, increased the number of women who abstained from smoking in late pregnancy (at 24‐40 weeks’ gestation) (on average, 227 vs 83 per 1000 women) and at 6 to 11 months postpartum (on average, 154 vs 40 per 1000 women). Results show no clear differences in smoking abstinence when financial incentives were used as part of tailored or multiple interventions in late pregnancy, or at 0 to 5 months postpartum. Financial incentives reduced self‐reported smoking in late pregnancy, but this was inconsistent with results from a randomized controlled trial (RCT) that used contingent and non‐contingent financial incentives that assessed smoking cessation biochemically. Findings of RCTs reveal no clear differences in preterm birth, low birth weight, or admission to neonatal intensive care unit (ICU); no RCTs reported very low birth weight or mortality (perinatal, stillbirth, neonatal).

Compared with less intensive interventions, more women abstained from smoking in late pregnancy (on average, 304 vs 83 per 1000 women) and at 0 to 5 months postpartum (on average, 214 vs 59 per 1000 women) when financial incentives were included as part of multiple interventions. Smoking reduction, birth weight, preterm birth, mortality (perinatal, stillbirth, neonatal), and admission to neonatal ICU were not reported by these trials.


Repository Staff Only: item control page