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Home > Clinical question: Can group behavior therapy programs increase smoking abstinence rates?

Burch, Jane and Tort, Sera (2017) Clinical question: Can group behavior therapy programs increase smoking abstinence rates? Cochrane Clinical Answers .

External website: https://www.cochranelibrary.com/cca/doi/10.1002/cc...

When a group‐format behavioral program (including identification of high‐risk situations, cognitive restructuring, role‐playing, advice, carbon monoxide assessment, and nicotine fading) was used to help people smoking an average of 20 to 30 cigarettes per day to quit, more people stopped smoking at six months than with no intervention (on average, 167 vs 64 per 1000 people; low‐quality evidence), a self‐help program (on average, 64 vs 34 per 1000 people; moderate‐quality evidence), or brief support (on average, 118 vs 95 per 1000 people; low‐quality evidence). However, it is worth noting that the proportion of people who quit smoking in both groups was low; therefore, the actual impact on absolute numbers of smokers who quit may be small. Randomized controlled trials reported no clear differences between groups in the numbers of people who quit smoking when comparing group‐format behavioral programs versus pharmacotherapy or individual therapy (both, moderate‐quality evidence).


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