Home > Clinical question: Can individual behavioral counseling increase smoking abstinence rates?

Burch, Jane and Tort, Sera (2017) Clinical question: Can individual behavioral counseling increase smoking abstinence rates? Cochrane Clinical Answers, .

External website: https://www.cochranelibrary.com/cca/doi/10.1002/cc...

Evidence of moderate to high quality shows that more people stopped smoking when they received counseling on an individual basis versus minimal contact (up to 15 minutes of advice, with or without self‐help materials) with or without pharmacotherapy (overall, on average, 94 vs 63 per 1000 people quit smoking). More intensive counseling also led to greater success than less intensive counseling (on average, 112 vs 87 per 1000 people quit smoking). However, it is worth noting that the proportion of people who quit was small in both groups; therefore, the actual impact of these interventions on absolute numbers of people who quit may be small.


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