Home > An evaluation of a framework for case-management in the Cork/Kerry region.

Ivers, Jo-Hanna H and Barry, Joseph (2017) An evaluation of a framework for case-management in the Cork/Kerry region. Dublin: Department of Publich Health and Primary Care, Institute of Population Health, Trinity College Dublin.

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This is the first external examination of the framework for case-managment in the Cork/Kerry region. A consultation day with a range of frontline workers as well as a research set consisting of a questionnaire, interviews and service user file was used to gather information about the implementation of the framework. In addition a sample of service users were interviewed across 5 agencies.

 

All data collection took place between January and June 2017. Overall the participants were enthusiastic for having a shared framework for case-management across the region and high value was placed on the consistency this could offer to service users.

 

Better inter-agency working was seen as key to providing quality care. However, there were challenges engaging all agencies and the notion of key ‘missing partners’ was noted throughout the research process. Service user involvement in the evaluation was limited and access to service user files was not permitted in all cases.

 

Case-management is a system that has evolved over many years and across several disciplines,thus several models exist. The current model of case-management in Cork/Kerry region is a blend of several models.

 

Most of the respondents suggested that they were either engaging in ‘medium-level’ or ‘high-level’ implementation.

 

The most commonly cited benefits to participating in the implementation of the framework included: ‘consistency’, ‘service user involvement’ and ‘reduces duplication’.

 

The highest proportions of caseloads with complex needs included: criminal justice, housing/homeless and dual diagnosis.

 

The benefits of having a shared framework across the Cork/Kerry region included: client centered,

reduced duplication, role clarity and professionalism, buy-in from partner agencies, standardisation

of both role and paperwork and transparency, service user involvement.

 

The case-management community supervision, which is supported by the HSE and delivered across both sectors emerged as a key theme with both benefits and drawbacks cited by participants.

 

The disadvantages of having a shared framework across the Cork/Kerry region included: the hierarchy, the missing partners, loss of professional identity, and the burden of administration.

Date:October 2017
Pages:60 p.
Publisher:Department of Publich Health and Primary Care, Institute of Population Health, Trinity College Dublin
Place of Publication:Dublin
EndNote:View
Accession Number:HRB (Electronic Only)
Subjects:HJ Treatment method > Substance disorder treatment method
J Health care, prevention and rehabilitation > Patient care management
J Health care, prevention and rehabilitation > Health care delivery
MA-ML Social science, culture and community > Community action > Community involvement > Task forces
MP-MR Policy, planning, economics, work and social services > Programme planning, implementation, and evaluation
MP-MR Policy, planning, economics, work and social services > Programme planning, implementation, and evaluation > Programme planning (strategy)
T Demographic characteristics > Substance or health care worker
T Demographic characteristics > Prevention worker
T Demographic characteristics > Social worker
VA Geographic area > Europe > Ireland

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