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Home > Do electronic cigarettes increase cigarette smoking in UK adolescents? Evidence from a 12-month prospective study.

Conner, Mark and Grogan, Sarah and Simms-Ellis, Ruth and Flett, Keira and Sykes-Muskett, Bianca and Cowap, Lisa and Lawton, Rebecca and Armitage, Christopher J and Meads, David and Torgerson, Carole and West, Robert and Siddiqi, Kamran (2018) Do electronic cigarettes increase cigarette smoking in UK adolescents? Evidence from a 12-month prospective study. Tobacco Control , 27 , (4) .

URL: https://tobaccocontrol.bmj.com/content/27/4/365

BACKGROUND: In cross-sectional surveys, increasing numbers of adolescents report using both electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes) and cigarettes. This study assessed whether adolescent e-cigarette use was associated prospectively with initiation or escalation of cigarette use.

METHODS: Data were from 2836 adolescents (aged 13-14 years at baseline) in 20 schools in England. At baseline, breath carbon monoxide levels, self-reported e-cigarette and cigarette use, sex, age, friends and family smoking, beliefs about cigarette use and percentage receiving free school meals (measure of socioeconomic status) were assessed. At 12-month follow-up, self-reported cigarette use was assessed and validated by breath carbon monoxide levels.

RESULTS: At baseline, 34.2% of adolescents reported ever using e-cigarettes (16.0% used only e-cigarettes). Baseline ever use of e-cigarettes was strongly associated with subsequent initiation and escalation of cigarette use.

CONCLUSIONS: This is the first study to report prospective relationships between ever use of e-cigarettes and initiation and escalation of cigarette use among UK adolescents. Ever use of e-cigarettes was robustly associated with initiation but more modestly related to escalation of cigarette use. Further research with longer follow-up in a broader age range of adolescents is required.


Item Type
Article
Publication Type
International, Open Access, Article
Drug Type
Tobacco / Nicotine
Intervention Type
Treatment method, Prevention
Source
Date
2018
Publisher
BMJ Publishing
Volume
27
Number
4
EndNote
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