Home > Routine use of patient reported outcome measures (PROMs) for improving treatment of common mental health disorders in adults.

Kendrick, Tony and El-Gohary, Magdy and Stuart, Beth and Gilbody, Simon and Churchill, Rachel and Aiken, Laura and Bhattacharya, Abhishek and Gimson, Amy and Brutt, Anna L and de Jong, Kim and Moore, Michael [The Cochrane Library] . (2016) Routine use of patient reported outcome measures (PROMs) for improving treatment of common mental health disorders in adults. London: John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, 7 DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD011119.pub2

URL: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/1465185...

What questions does this review aim to answer?
• Does the use of PROMs to monitor progress in people with CMHDs improve health outcomes, including symptoms, quality of life, and social functioning?
• Does the use of PROMs in people with CMHDs change the way their problems are managed, including drug therapy and referrals for specialist help?

Which studies were included in the review?
Trial databases were searched to find all high-quality studies of the use of PROMs to monitor the treatment of CMHDs published up to May 2015. Included studies had to be randomised controlled trials in adult participants, where the majority diagnosed had a CMHD. Seventeen studies involving 8787 participants were included in the review, nine from mental health, six from psychological therapy, and two from primary care settings.
The quality of the studies was rated ‘low’ to 'moderate'.

What does the evidence from the review tell us?
Routine outcome monitoring of CMHDs using PROMs was not shown conclusively to be helpful in analyses combining study results, either in terms of improving patient symptom outcomes (across 12 studies), or in changing the duration of treatment for their conditions (across seven studies). It was not possible to analyse changes in drug treatment or referrals for further treatment as only two studies reported these. Similarly, health-related quality of life, social functioning, adverse events, and costs were reported in very few studies.

What should happen next?
More research of better quality is required, especially in primary care where most CMHDs are treated. Studies should include people treated with drugs as well as psychological therapies, and should follow them for longer than six months. As well as symptoms and length of treatment, studies should measure possible harms, quality of life, social functioning, and the costs of monitoring.


Item Type:Evidence resource
Publication Type:Review
Intervention Type:Screening
Source:The Cochrane Library
Date:July 2016
Publisher:John Wiley & Sons, Ltd
Place of Publication:London
Volume:7
EndNote:View
Subjects:G Health and disease > State of health > Mental health
HJ Treatment method > Treatment outcome
J Health care, prevention and rehabilitation > Patient care management
J Health care, prevention and rehabilitation > Care by type of problem > Mental health care

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