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Home > Computerised cognitive behavioural therapy for alcohol use disorder: a pilot randomised control trial.

Farren, Conor Kevin and Milnes, Jennie and Lambe, K and Ahern, Sinead (2015) Computerised cognitive behavioural therapy for alcohol use disorder: a pilot randomised control trial. Irish Journal of Psychological Medicine , 32 , (3) , pp. 237-246.


Background Cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) has been used in the treatment of alcohol use disorder (AUD), generally in individual or group therapy, but not via computer.

Aim This study examined the effectiveness of an interactive, personalised, computer-based CBT therapy in a randomised control trial.

Methods We studied a group of 55 patients with AUD, randomised to either 5-hour-long computerised CBT sessions or a placebo cognitive-stimulating session, together with a 4-week inpatient rehabilitation treatment, and followed them for 3 months.

Results There was a high degree of patient adherence to the protocol. Both groups did well, with a significant fall in alcohol outcome measures including number of drinks per drinking day, and number of drinking days, and an increase in abstinence rates in both groups to an equivalent level. The CBT group attended alcoholics anonymous groups more frequently, and had significant alterations in their alcohol self-efficacy outcomes, which correlated with their drinking outcomes. We concluded that computerised CBT is a potentially useful clinical tool that warrants further investigation in different treatment settings for AUD.

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