Home > Factors associated with self-cutting as a method of self-harm: findings from the Irish National Registry of Deliberate Self-Harm.

Arensman, Ella and Larkin, Celine and Corcoran, Paul and Reulbach, Udo and Perry, Ivan J (2014) Factors associated with self-cutting as a method of self-harm: findings from the Irish National Registry of Deliberate Self-Harm. European Journal of Public Health , 24 , (2) , pp. 292-297.

BACKGROUND

Research suggests that patients presenting to hospital with self-cutting differ from those with intentional overdose in demographic and clinical characteristics. However, large-scale national studies comparing self-cutting patients with those using other self-harm methods are lacking. We aimed to compare hospital-treated self-cutting and intentional overdose, to examine the role of gender in moderating these differences, and examine the characteristics and outcomes of those patients presenting with combined self-cutting and overdose.

METHODS

Between 2003 and 2010, the Irish National Registry of Deliberate Self-Harm recorded 42,585 self-harm presentations to Irish hospital emergency departments meeting the study inclusion criteria. Data were obtained on demographic and clinical characteristics by independent data registration officers.

RESULTS

Compared with overdose only, involvement of self-cutting (with or without overdose) was significantly more common in males than females, with an overrepresentation of males aged <35 years. Independent of gender, involvement of self-cutting (with or without overdose) was significantly associated with younger age, city residence, repetition within 30 days and repetition within a year (females only). Factors associated with self-cutting as the sole method were no fixed abode/living in an institution, presenting outside 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., not consuming alcohol and repetition between 31 days and 1 year (males only).

CONCLUSION

The demographic and clinical differences between self-harm patients underline the presence of different subgroups with implications for service provision and prevention of repeated self-harm. Given the relationship between self-cutting and subsequent repetition, service providers need to ensure that adequate follow-up arrangements and supports are in place for the patient.


Item Type:Article
Date:April 2014
Page Range:pp. 292-297
Volume:24
Number:2
EndNote:View
Subjects:A Substance use, abuse, and dependence > Effects and consequences
F Concepts in psychology > Specific attitude and behaviour > risk-taking behaviour
F Concepts in psychology > Specific attitude and behaviour > self-destructive behaviour
G Health and disease > Substance use disorder > Alcohol use
G Health and disease > Substance use disorder > Drug use
G Health and disease > Substance use disorder > Drug use > Drug intoxication > Poisoning (overdose)
J Health care, prevention and rehabilitation > Risk and protective factors > Risk factors

Click here to request a copy of this literature (must be logged in)

Repository Staff Only: item control page