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Home > National Office for Suicide Prevention annual report 2011.

National Office for Suicide Prevention. (2012) National Office for Suicide Prevention annual report 2011. Dublin: Health Service Executive.

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Key achievements in 2011
• Extra €1 million allocated to 22 new projects funded by the NOSP including:
* Dialectical behavioural therapy training for frontline HSE Mental Health Services staff
* New emergency department training programme for frontline acute staff
* Intervention services for people who engage in suicidal behaviour
* Samaritans project to interlink national mental health and suicide prevention helplines
* National training needs analysis and development of training programme for general practitioners.
• Over 3,500 people trained in ASIST (Applied Suicide Intervention Skills Training) and nearly 5,000 in safeTALK (suicide alertness training).
• Launch of new elements of Your Mental Health campaign, including radio advertisements and the redevelopment of the campaign website
• www.yourmentalhealth.ie.
• Independent evaluation of the Your Mental Health campaign demonstrated high levels of awareness of the campaign among the target population and high levels of effectiveness.
• National standards for bereavement support services developed, in partnership with Console and Turas le Cheile bereavement support services.
• Responding to Murder Suicide and Suicide Clusters: Guidance Document completed and disseminated.
• Evaluation of Understanding Self Harm, a new self harm awareness training programme.
• Suicide Support Information System pilot study initiated by the National Suicide Research Foundation.
• Ongoing development of National Guidelines for Post Primary Schools on Mental Health and Suicide Prevention.

Statistics:
• Suicide and self harm: An overview of key statistics
• 552 deaths by suicide occurred in 2009, a rate of 12.4 deaths per 100,000 population1. By European standards Ireland has the sixth lowest rate of death by suicide, with a reported rate of 10.3 per 100,000, compared with the lowest rate of 3.9 in Greece and the highest of 34 in Lithuania.
• In Ireland, the suicide rate is significantly higher for males than for females.
• In Ireland, the suicide rate is highest for young males aged between 20 and 24 and for females aged between 50 and 54.
• The male suicide rate recorded in 2009 was 20.0, a drop from its peak of 23.5 in 1998. • The female suicide rate has remained relatively constant, ranging from 4.3 in 1980 to 4.3 in 1998 to 4.9 per 100,000 in 2009.
• In 2011, there were 12,216 presentations to hospital due to deliberate self harm nationally, involving 9,834 individuals.
• The rate of individuals presenting to hospital following deliberate self harm in 2011 was 215 per 100,000, a significant 4% decrease on the rate in 2010.
• The national male rate of deliberate self harm was 205 per 100,000, 3% lower than in 2010. The female rate of deliberate self harm in 2011 was 226 per 100,000, 4% lower than in 2010.


Date
October 2012
Pages
64 p.
Publisher
Health Service Executive
Corporate Creators
National Office for Suicide Prevention
Place of Publication
Dublin
EndNote
Accession Number
HRB (Electronic Only)

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