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Home > The impact of banning smoking in workplaces: what are the early effects?

Allwright, Shane (2008) The impact of banning smoking in workplaces: what are the early effects? Applied Health Economics & Health Policy, 6, (2-3), pp. 81-92. doi: 10.2165/00148365-200806020-00001.

Smoke-free workplace legislation reduces the exposure of both the general public and the workforce to second-hand smoke (SHS) without evidence of an increased exposure to SHS in children in the home. The reductions in exposure are linked to improved respiratory health in previously heavily exposed occupational groups such as bar, restaurant and casino staff. From some countries, there is evidence suggesting that smoking bans have led to declines in hospital admissions for myocardial infarction.

There is general agreement that smoking bans, if associated with other tobacco control measures such as tax increases, together with provision of cessation supports, lead to a reduction in the numbers of cigarettes smoked and probably lower smoking rates. Most cities, regions and countries report neutral or positive economic impacts


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