Home > Comparing media and family predictors of alcohol use: a cohort study of US adolescents.

Stoolmiller, Mike and Wills, Thomas A and McClure, Auden C and Tanski, Susanne E and Worth, Keilah A and Gerrard, Meg and Sargent, James D (2012) Comparing media and family predictors of alcohol use: a cohort study of US adolescents. BMJ Open , 2 , (1: e000543) .

URL: http://bmjopen.bmj.com/content/2/1/e000543.full.pd...

Objective: To compare media/marketing exposures and family factors in predicting adolescent alcohol use.

Design: Cohort study.
Setting: Confidential telephone survey of adolescents in their homes.

Participants: Representative sample of 6522 US adolescents, aged 10–14 years at baseline and surveyed four times over 2 years.

Primary: outcome measure Time to alcohol onset and progression to binge drinking were assessed with two survival models. Predictors were movie alcohol exposure (MAE), ownership of alcohol-branded merchandise and characteristics of the family (parental alcohol use, home availability of alcohol and parenting). Covariates included sociodemographics, peer drinking and personality factors.

Results: Over the study period, the prevalence of adolescent ever use and binge drinking increased from 11% to 25% and from 4% to 13%, respectively. At baseline, the median estimated MAE from a population of 532 movies was 4.5 h and 11% owned alcohol-branded merchandise at time 2. Parental alcohol use (greater than or equal to weekly) was reported by 23% and 29% of adolescents could obtain alcohol from home.

Peer drinking, MAE, alcohol-branded merchandise, age and rebelliousness were associated with both alcohol onset and progression to binge drinking. The adjusted hazard ratios for alcohol onset and binge drinking transition for high versus low MAE exposure were 2.13 (95% CI 1.76 to 2.57) and 1.63 (1.20 to 2.21), respectively, and MAE accounted for 28% and 20% of these transitions, respectively. Characteristics of the family were associated with alcohol onset but not with progression.

Conclusion: The results suggest that family focused interventions would have a larger impact on alcohol onset while limiting media and marketing exposure could help prevent both onset and progression.


Item Type:Article
Date:2012
Publisher:BMJ Publishing
Volume:2
Number:1: e000543
EndNote:View
Accession Number:HRB (Not in collection)
Subjects:L Social psychology and related concepts > Marital relations > Family and kinship > Family relations > Family role
A Substance use, abuse, and dependence > Prevalence > Problem substance use
J Health care, prevention and rehabilitation > Prevention approach > Family-focused prevention
A Substance use, abuse, and dependence > Prevalence > Substance use behaviour > Alcohol consumption
L Social psychology and related concepts > Marital relations > Family and kinship > Family relations > Parent-child relations
VA Geographic area > United States
L Social psychology and related concepts > Marital relations > Family and kinship > Family relations > Family role > Role of parent
HJ Treatment method > Psychosocial treatment method > Family or marital therapy
G Health and disease > Substance use disorder > Alcohol use
J Health care, prevention and rehabilitation > Risk and protective factors
MP-MR Policy, planning, economics, work and social services > Marketing and public relations (advertising)
N Communication, information and education > Message (portrayal of substance use) > Portrayal of substance use in the media

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