Home > A brief cognitive behavioural therapy alcohol intervention programme is an effective secondary prevention approach for new employees entering an Irish workforce: a pilot.

McCarthy, Paul M (2008) A brief cognitive behavioural therapy alcohol intervention programme is an effective secondary prevention approach for new employees entering an Irish workforce: a pilot. Masters thesis, University College Cork.

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The prevalence of unhealthy drinking at all levels in Irish society poses serious issues in terms of the consequence to individuals concerned, as well as to society as a whole. The workplace offers a useful setting for early identification and intervention with new employees who may have pre-existing alcohol use disorder issues.

This pilot study aimed to evaluate the effectiveness within the workplace of a brief Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT) intervention in reducing participants binge and risky drinking behaviours. Twenty-six Irish Naval recruits volunteered to participate in this randomised controlled trial. The intervention was conducted over four consecutive one and a half hour weekly sessions. Participants completed four principle outcome measures at intake, termination of the intervention and at the two-month follow-up assessment. The Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test (Babor, Higginis-Biddle, Saunders & Monterio, 2001) was used to measures participants’ consumption levels and frequency of binge or risky drinking. A Readiness Ruler (Miller, Zweben, Diclemente, & Rychtarik, 1992) was used to measure participants’ readiness to change drinking, while the Drinking Expectancy Questionnaire (Young & Oei, 1996) was used to measure participants’ beliefs pertaining to alcohol, and their ability to refuse alcohol in high-risk social surroundings.

There were preliminary data in support of the intervention. There were interaction effects that approached statistical significance for both a reduction in participants’ binge drinking (p =. 064) and an increase in participants’ ability to refuse alcohol in high-risk social settings (p = .059). There was also a significant interaction effect (p < .05) between time and group where participants lowered their alcohol expectancies on the Increased Confidence Factor of the Drinking Expectancy Questionnaire.

This thesis suggests that a large number of recruits currently enlisting in the Irish Navy have existing drinking patterns, which are a cause for concern. This study also indicates that within the workplace early intervention using CBT has the potential to assist new employees in reducing their risky drinking behaviour.


Item Type:Thesis (Masters)
Date:2008
Pages:128 p.
EndNote:View
Accession Number:HRB (Electronic Only)
Related URLs:
Subjects:J Health care, prevention and rehabilitation > Basic prevention categories > Targeted prevention
VA Geographic area > Europe > Ireland
HJ Treatment method > Directive and nondirective therapy > Psychoanalytic therapy > Cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT)
MP-MR Policy, planning, economics, work and social services > Labour and work > Employment and unemployment

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