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Home > Systematic reviews in the social sciences: a practical guide.

Petticrew, Mark and Roberts, Helen (2006) Systematic reviews in the social sciences: a practical guide. Oxford: Blackwell.

Such diverse thinkers as Lao-Tze, Confucius, and U.S. Defense Secretary Donald Rumsfeld have all pointed out that we need to be able to tell the difference between real and assumed knowledge. The systematic review is a scientific tool that can help with this difficult task. It can help, for example, with appraising, summarising, and communicating the results and implications of otherwise unmanageable quantities of data. This is important because quite often there are so many studies, and their results are often so conflicting, that no policymaker or practitioner could possibly carry out this task themselves.Systematic review methods have been widely used in health care, and are becoming increasingly common in the social sciences (fostered, for example, by the work of the Campbell Collaboration).

This book outlines the rationale and methods of systematic reviews, giving worked examples from social science and other fields. It requires no previous knowledge, but takes the reader through the process stage by stage. It draws on examples from such diverse fields as psychology, criminology, education, transport, social welfare, public health, and housing and urban policy, among others.The book includes detailed sections on assessing the quality of both quantitative, and qualitative research; searching for evidence in the social sciences;meta-analytic and other methods of evidence synthesis; publication bias; heterogeneity; and approaches to dissemination.


Item Type
Book
Publication Type
International, Book
Date
2006
Call No
RD10.2
Pages
xv, 33
Publisher
Blackwell
Place of Publication
Oxford
ISBN
1-4051-2110-6
EndNote
Accession Number
HRB 3753 (Available), HRB 3738 (Available)

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