Home > Heavy drinking: the myth of alcoholism as a disease.

Fingarette, Herbert (1988) Heavy drinking: the myth of alcoholism as a disease. Berkeley: University of California Press .

Fingarette aims to refute evidence that alcoholism is a disease. Rejecting the terms alcoholic and disease, he points out that many "heavy drinkers" do not experience craving and/or loss of control, can engage in controlled drinking, and have spontaneous recovery. He also notes the variable success rates of medical treatment programs. Ultimately, Fingarette states that heavy drinking is dependent upon a host of situational factors. The heavy drinker is not "a passive patient who will be treated by an expert . . ." but an individual capable of exercising control and assuming responsibility. The weakness here is that alcoholism and heavy drinking are in fact different entities; in discussing alcoholism there is room for both a disease and a situational model.


Item Type:Book
Date:1988
Call No:BB, AD12.16.4
Pages:x, 166
Publisher:University of California Press
Place of Publication:Berkeley
ISBN:0-250-06754-1
EndNote:View
Accession Number:HRB 210 (Available)
Subjects:L Social psychology and related concepts > Marital relations > Family and kinship > Family and substance use
A Substance use, abuse, and dependence > Theory of substance use > Biopsychosocial substance use disorder theory
G Health and disease > Disease model
F Concepts in psychology > Specific attitude and behaviour > choice-making behaviour
G Health and disease > Substance use disorder > Alcohol use > Alcohol dependence
A Substance use, abuse, and dependence > Theory of substance use > Biological substance use disorder theory

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