Home > Nalbuphine (Nubain): Non-prescribed use, injecting, and risk behaviors for bloodborne viruses.

Connolly, Dominic and McElrath, Karen (2007) Nalbuphine (Nubain): Non-prescribed use, injecting, and risk behaviors for bloodborne viruses. Contemporary Drug Problems, 33 (2). pp. 321-340.

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Nalbuphine hydrochloride is a synthetic opiate with agonist-antagonist properties that has been prescribed for pain relief in several countries in North and Central America, Europe, and elsewhere. This drug has been marketed under the tradename NubainReg and was believed to have low potential for dependence. Previous research has noted misuse among bodybuilders, weightlifters, and users of anabolic steroids. This study examines patterns of nalbuphine misuse and injecting behaviours that pose risk for blood-borne viruses among ten respondents residing largely in one community in Ireland. Contrary to other research findings, most individuals had no history of weightlifting and no experience with the use of anabolic steroids. Most of the respondents had injected nalbuphine several times per day, and reported frequent injection of stimulants. Implications of the findings are discussed.

 

Item Type:Article
Date:2007
Call No:BL, Northern Ireland
Page Range:pp. 321-340
Publisher:Federal Legal Publications Ltd
Volume:33
Number:2
Keywords:CNS stimulants, intravenous drug user, Ireland, steroid abuse
EndNote:View
Accession Number:HRB 3709 (Electronic Only)
Subjects:G Health and disease > Disorder by cause > Communicable disease
T Demographic Characteristics > Intravenous / injecting drug user
VA Geographic area > Europe > Ireland
J Health care, prevention and rehabilitation > Risk and protective factors
B AOD Substances > Opioids (opiates)
J Health care, prevention and rehabilitation > Health-related prevention > Health information and education > Communicable disease control

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